In 2016, House Republicans placed special emphasis on enacting policies promoting greater public safety for Hoosiers.

Unfortunately, human trafficking is the fastest growing and second largest criminal industry in the world. Three new Indiana laws focus on combating this heinous crime.

House Enrolled Act (HEA) 1199, authored by State Rep. Wendy McNamara, requires an individual found guilty of promoting the trafficking of a minor to register as a sex offender on the Indiana Sex and Violent Offender Registry. The Indiana Department of Correction and police officers across the state monitor the database to track offenders to ensure they are not breaking the law once released.

HEA 1028, authored by State Rep. Randy Truitt, increases penalties for individuals profiting from human trafficking and those who knowingly visit places in violation of trafficking laws. Senate Enrolled Act (SEA) 305, sponsored by State Reps. Dave Frizzell and Wendy McNamara, allows the Department of Child Services to intervene and serve children who are victims of human trafficking.

Here are highlights of other new laws to keep Hoosiers safe:

  • HEA 1105: Protecting children conceived as the result of rape by allowing mothers to request the termination of the rapist’s parental rights.
  • SEA 14: Increasing penalties for criminals convicted of child exploitation and pornography crimes.
  • HEA 1048: Requiring motorists in minor crashes to safely move vehicles to the side of the road and out of traffic.
  • SEA 248: Prohibiting motorists convicted of speeding twice in work zones within a year from driving for 60 days.
  • SEA 357: Posting names and records of individuals convicted of child abuse on an online registry maintained by the state court system.
  • HEA 1019: Balancing public transparency with the privacy rights of citizens by establishing guidelines for releasing police video recordings.
  • HEA 1211: Increasing penalties for criminals who cause property damage while manufacturing meth, and tracking meth-fire incidents to combat the problem.

Follow #NewIndianaLaws on social media and our blog series for more highlights of laws effective July 1, 2016.